FAQ


How long do animals stay up for adoption?

Are you a “No-Kill” Shelter?

I can no longer keep my pet. Can I bring him to MHS to be adopted?

My pet is missing. What should I do?

What do I need to do to get a dog license?

There is an injured/dead wild animal on my property. What should I do?

My neighbor’s dog barks all of the time. Who can help with that problem?

How do I become a volunteer?

Do you have volunteer opportunities for students?


How long do animals stay up for adoption?

There is no time limit for adoption animals. Most of our animals are adopted within a week or two, if not sooner. Dogs and cats that are available for adoption for an extended time are monitored closely and given enrichment activities to keep their stress to a minimum.


Are you a “No-Kill” Shelter?

The Marin Humane Society believes the use of the phrase, “No kill” is misleading and divisive. Many organizations simply limit their intake of animals to only the highly adoptable, they send the animals to another organization for euthanasia and/or they do euthanize for health and temperament and feel they can define themselves as “no kill” anyway.

We refer to MHS as an “Open Door” shelter, meaning we will accept any animal brought in to us, regardless of the reasons or needs. As the only animal shelter serving Marin county, we also accept stray or lost animals brought in by the public or by our Animal Services Officers.

We are fortunate to have the resources to ensure that the dogs and cats at MHS are not euthanized simply due to lack of space or time. Our shelter, foster program, animal care, behavior, and veterinary services staff all help keep the animals happy, healthy and safe during their time here at the shelter. Please read our position below on euthanasia for additional information.

All animals that can reasonably be adopted are placed in the Marin Humane Society's (MHS) adoption program or through other rescue and placement organizations. Euthanasia decisions are taken very seriously at MHS and require the consideration of many factors and resources, with the health and well-being of the animal always a priority.

When we are compelled by the circumstances presented to make this decision, we consider each case individually including but not limited to any behavioral issues that cannot be rehabilitated, any untreatable medical conditions and/or if the animal is in extreme pain or suffering. MHS never euthanizes based on the state-mandated holding period and has no set time limit for how long animals are with MHS. Our staff understands the importance of basing these decisions on reasonable efforts to provide for an animal's well-being and having the information to support the euthanasia decision.

Alternative options will always be reasonably explored for the animals. And when the decision to proceed with euthanasia is made, MHS insists on providing the most humane treatment during the final moments of an animal's life, regardless of the circumstances.

Revised August 2014


I can no longer keep my pet. Can I bring him to MHS to be adopted?

We always recommend that you surrender your pet to a shelter only as your last option. Notify friends, family members, neighbors and coworkers that you need to rehome your pet. This type of networking can have very positive results. If you have a purebred dog, there are some breed-specific rescue organizations that may be able to help you place your pet.

If you must surrender your pet to the shelter, we recommend you call us first to discuss the situation. Our Customer Care Technicians may have some other options to offer that you haven't yet considered. You will be asked important questions about why you must relinquish your animal, and any health or temperament issues your pet may have. We will discuss with you our adoption and euthanasia policies, and the fees to surrender your pet. If you bring your pet to the shelter for surrender, you will be asked to fill out a Guardian's Questionnaire giving us valuable information regarding your pet's history. Additionally, it is very helpful for us if you bring any vet records you may have for your pet. We have a very successful adoption program, but not every animal surrendered to us becomes a candidate for adoption.


My pet is missing. What should I do?

Search our online lost pets database or come to the shelter to see if your missing pet has been turned in as a stray. If your pet is not here, you can fill out a lost animal report and take a lost animal poster to post around your neighborhood. We have a Lost Animal Recording that lists all of the strays brought into the shelter in the past 48 hours. Please call 415.883.4631, x377 for cats, x378 for dogs, and x379 for other animals. This recording is updated Tuesday through Sunday at 6 p.m.


 

What do I need to do to get a dog license?

In order to issue a dog license, we need a copy of a current rabies vaccination certificate. If your dog has been spayed or neutered, written verification of alteration is required to qualify for the discounted fee. The guardian may come to the shelter to purchase a dog license or the paperwork may be mailed to the shelter along with payment. A dog license application can be downloaded.


There is an injured/dead wild animal on my property. What should I do?

If the animal is mobile, even if it is injured or sick, we often need to leave it alone as the stress of being pursued by humans can cause further injury or even death. If the animal is not mobile, we will immediately send an Animal Services Officer to evaluate the situation. Please call 415.882.4621, x1, or 415.309.6339 after hours.

We pick up dead wildlife seven days a week. There is a charge of (for animals on private property) of $75 for small wild animals under 50 lbs., such as raccoons, opossums, skunks and squirrels. The charge for wild animals over 50 lbs., such as deer is $125. In order to arrange for a pick-up, call 415.883.4621 during regular business hours.


My neighbor’s dog barks all of the time. Who can help with that problem?

Your local police department or the sheriff’s department handles barking complaints because they are a violation of the noise nuisance ordinance. If the officer determines that the dog is barking because of a situation of abuse, neglect, or cruelty, they will call us for assistance.


How do I become a volunteer?

Simply fill out the Volunteer Application. Once the application is received by the Volunteer Department, you will be contacted about attending a mandatory volunteer orientation.  Following the orientation your application will be forwarded to the department supervisor of your interest.  The department supervisor will contact you to set up an interview and/or training.


Do you have volunteer opportunities for students?

We have our Animal Care Club for middle school students and Roots & Shoots for high school students. Many students call us about required community service hours; to fulfill this requirement we encourage you to work on an independent project. Check the student volunteer section of the website for community service project ideas or call 415.506.6288.

 

 

Marin Humane Society

171 Bel Marin Keys Blvd, Novato, CA 94949
Phone 415.883.4621

Copyright 2011